The Warlord wrecking Sudan’s revolution

The warlord wrecking Sudan’s revolution – The Washington Post

(Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images)

For the first time since April, Sudan’s ousted strongman, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, made a public appearance. On Sunday, the former dictator emerged from prison clad in his trademark white robes and was taken by police to court, where he faced corruption-related charges, including embezzlement and the possession of foreign currency. But glaringly absent from the allegations were the far worse crimes associated with Bashir’s three-decade rule. Bashir is wanted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide charges related to his regime’s vicious counterinsurgency more than a decade ago in the Darfur region.

That veneer of accountability sums up the grim state of Sudan’s fragile political moment. Bashir was brought down in April after protesters took to the streets for months, clamoring for his exit and a transition to a civilian government in the country. Their pressure compelled Bashir’s former allies in Sudan’s security apparatus to remove him from power. But in the weeks since, the junta that replaced Bashir has cracked down on the protest movement and political opposition with brutality reminiscent of the horrors unleashed in Darfur, where government-backed militias carried out hideous slaughters of predominantly non-Arab communities between 2003 and 2008.

On June 3, soldiers from the Rapid Support Forces, or the RSF, a notorious paramilitary group, attacked protesters in Khartoum, ransacking a central site that the pro-democracy movement had occupied for months. At least 128 were killed, according to the main protest organization. Reports continue to surface of militia forces dumping bodies in the Nile, while subjecting protesters to rape, beatings and other acts of torture. A nationwide clampdown on the Internet followed, shutting off many of the avenues the opposition had to share information with each other and the outside world.

“Now that the sit-in site . . . is in ashes, there is an overwhelming feeling of isolation,” journalist Zeinab Mohammed Salih wrote in a BBC dispatch this week. “Not only are the demonstrators no longer able to gather, but they have found it difficult to communicate and share their disappointment, frustration and anger at the turn of events.”

The junta’s de facto leader is Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, who’s also known as Hemeti. Hamdan is no would-be democrat — he’s the head of the RSF, which, before being rebranded, rampaged through Darfur as the infamous Janjaweed militia. Now, as Declan Walsh of the New York Times reported, Hamdan is trying to present himself as a savior. Over the weekend, he took an armed convoy to a rally 40 miles outside the capital, where supporters greeted him with chants celebrating army rule.

“If I did not come to this position, the country would be lost,” Hamdan told the Times, denying responsibility for the slaughter of protesters while also blaming the opposition for goading security forces. “People say Hemeti is too powerful and evil,” he added. “But it’s just scaremongering. My power comes from the Sudanese people.”

In public remarks, Hamdan has panned the protesters and appeared to renege on earlier deals made between the junta — known as the Transitional Military Council — and the main opposition groups. A central sticking point remains the composition of a transitional legislative body that would eventually pave the way for fresh elections. Activists fear Hamdan and Lt. Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, the more senior face of the junta, may move to appoint a parallel body and further erode what hope there is for a civilian-led democracy. Ethiopian attempts to broker a way forward appear to have made little headway.

“There is a total impasse. The negotiations have been suspended, Internet services remain blocked, and the Ethiopian mediations apparently did not make progress,” Dura Gambo, an activist with the Sudanese Professionals Association, the lead protest group, told the Associated Press. Despite the violence, the opposition is planning on reviving its campaign with nighttime vigils and marches in the country’s cities.

International pressure is slowly mounting on the junta. Western governments are demanding it account for the killings this month. “We believe very strongly there has to be an independent, credible investigation to figure out what exactly happened, why it happened, who gave the orders, how many victims there were,” U.S. Assistant Secretary for African Affairs Tibor Nagy told journalists in Ethi­o­pia last week.

“It is clear that the responsibility lies with the Transitional Military Council (TMC) as the authority in charge of protecting the population,” a group of European Union foreign ministers said in a statement on Monday, which hailed the “historic opportunity” posed by the protest movement and added to the calls for an independent investigation.

Hamdan and his allies have so far rebuffed those demands. In their camp are a conspicuous crop of Arab autocracies — Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt. The two Gulf monarchies, in particular, are invested in preserving the military regime; Hamdan recently visited Riyadh and met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

“Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are instead driven by their own fear that should a major Arab country transition to democracy, it would lead to upheavals at home,” Iyad El-Bagdhadi, an Arab pro-democracy activist, wrote earlier this month. He added that “as long as the military junta has political and financial support from the Saudis and the Emiratis, it will have little reason to back down.”

That’s all the more galling when set against the horrors associated with Hamdan’s career. Niemat Ahmadi, the founder of the Washington-based Darfur Women Action Group, described Hamdan to Today’s WorldView as a “bandit” who gained notoriety amid Bashir’s vicious response to the rebellion in Darfur. The lack of real justice for the government’s actions in Darfur, she argued, underlies what’s happening now.

“The reason Hemeti grew prominent was because of the people he killed, the number of villages he destroyed, the many women who were raped,” Ahmadi said. “Now, they repeated whatever they did in Darfur in Khartoum.”

She said that “the TMC was not as confident until Saudi [Arabia] and [the] UAE came into play,” referring to the assurances of support and billions in promised security aid that Hamdan and Burhan procured after removing Bashir.

The two gulf powers may be offering him some lessons in messaging too. In his interview with the Times, Hamdan was unapologetic, styling his forces as the guarantors of national stability — a mantra often preached in Riyadh and Abu Dhabi. “The country needs the Rapid Support Forces more than the Rapid Support Forces need the country,” he said.

Link to web article.

Please follow and like us:

Sudan opposition leader escapes to Juba

Monday June 10 2019. By JOHN ADUKATA

Yasir Arman arrives at Khartoum airport on January 21, 2010. He arrived in Juba, South Sudan after being release by the Sudan ruling Transitional Military Council on June 10, 2019. PHOTO | FILE | NATION MEDIA GROUP 

Sudan opposition leader Yasir Arman arrived in Juba, South Sudan on Monday after he was released together with two other rebel leaders by the military junta.

Mr. Arman is the deputy chairperson of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/ Army- North (SPLM/A/N), an armed faction based in the Blue Nile region.

He had been arrested on June 5 by the Sudan’s Transitional Military Council (TMC) for allegedly fuelling protests in the crisis-hit country.

He had earlier defied a military ultimatum that he leaves the country on accusations that he was positioning himself to become the President of Sudan with the help of foreign financiers.

The rebel leader was accused of enjoying foreign backing and positioning himself to become the President of the Sudan.
The release of the trio – the others are Ismail Jalab and Mubarak Ardol – is believed to have been negotiated by Ethiopian premier Ahmed Abiy who was on a reconciliation mission in Khartoum last week.

Mr Abiy met TMC, Alliance for Freedom and Change and other political leaders with a message that Sudan reverts to democratic rule.

Jalab and Ardol were detained from their residences after meeting with Mr Abiy Ahmed in Khartoum on Friday for talks aimed at reviving negotiations between the generals and protest leaders.

Arman arrived in Khartoum on May 26 to take part in talks with Sudan’s ruling generals who took power after the ouster of president Omar al-Bashir in April following months of mass protests against his authoritarian rule and worsening economic conditions.

On June 3 military forces raided a sit-in outside the army headquarters in Khartoum, starting a week of violent crackdown that has officially left 61 dead, 49 of them from live ammunition.

The protesters put the toll at 118.
The SPLM-N’s armed wing has battled Bashir’s forces in the Blue Nile and South Kordofan states since 2011.

The rebel group is part of the Alliance for Freedom and Change. It had set Arman’s release as one of several conditions before any fresh negotiations with the generals could begin.
The protest movement wants the ruling military council to hand over power to a civilian-led administration.

The protesters started a nationwide civil disobedience campaign on Sunday, paralysing transport and shutting down cities like Omdurman, al-Obeid and Port Sudan.

In the capital Khartoum, however, several shops and fuel stations opened and buses ran on Monday, the second day of disobedience.
The health ministry says 61 people died nationwide in last week’s crackdown, 49 of them from “live ammunition” in Khartoum.

https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/news/ea/Sudan-opposition-leader-escapes-to-Juba/4552908-5151788-bwtwq4z/index.html

Please follow and like us:

Hemedti: We Will Only Transfer Sudan to Safe Hands !

Deputy head of Sudan’s Transitional Military Council Lieutenant General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo(Reuters) 

Tuesday, 28 May, 2019 – 05:15

Sudan’s alliance of opposition and protest groups said on Monday that it would push ahead with a general two-day strike starting on Tuesday hours after the Transitional Military Council said it was ready to hand over power swiftly.

Deputy head of the TMC, Lieutenant General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, commonly known as “Hemedti”, added however that the opposition was not being serious about sharing power and wanted to confine the military to a ceremonial role.

“By God, their slogans cheated us. I swear we were honest with them 100 percent,” Hemedti said at a dinner with police. “That’s why, by God Almighty, we will not hand this country except to safe hands.”

Talks between the TMC and the Declaration of Freedom and Change Forces (DFCF) alliance are at a standstill after weeks of negotiations over who will have the upper hand after the ouster of long-time President Omar al-Bashir last month, civilians or the military.

Wagdy Saleh, a representative of a coalition within the DFCF, told a news conference called by the alliance that the TMC had demanded a two-thirds majority, of eight to three, on the sovereign council that will lead the country.

Hemedti said the military council respects many members of the opposition movement, including Sadiq al-Mahdi, who heads the Umma Party that is part of the alliance.

Mahdi rejected the strike on Sunday.

However, his son, Al-Sadeeq Sadiq al-Mahdi, told Al Arabiya TV after Hemedti’s remarks: “Our stated position is not a rejection of the principle of strike, but our logic is that there is no need to escalate now.”

The TMC has suggested that if an agreement cannot be reached between the two sides, elections should be held.

“We are not saying we will not negotiate,” Hemedti said. “But we have to guarantee that all the Sudanese people are participating in the matter.”

“We do not cheat, nor do we want power,” Hemedti said, adding that elections could be held in as little as three months in order to “…choose a government from the Sudanese people.”

Mubarak Ardol, who represents the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, said at the news conference that it was essential to have an accurate and transparent census before elections can be held because millions of Sudanese remain displaced or refugees and would therefore be excluded.

“Elections cannot be held in the current situation,” Ardol said.

The DFCF said Tuesday’s strike would encompass public and private enterprise, including the civil aviation, railway, petroleum, banking, communications and health sectors.

If an agreement is not reached with the TMC, the DFCF will escalate by calling for an open strike and indefinite civil disobedience until power is handed to civilians, Saleh said.

The military ousted and detained Bashir on April 11, ending his 30-year rule after 16 weeks of street protests against him spearheaded by the Sudanese Professionals’ Association, part of the DFCF.

Hemedti said on Monday: “These people’s goal is for us to hand over to them and return to our barracks.”

https://aawsat.com/english/home/article/1742716/hemedti-we-will-only-transfer-sudan-safe-hands

Please follow and like us:

NISS guards prevent Sudanese police from entering Gosh’s house!

 

 

May 21, 2019 (KHARTOUM) – Security guards of the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS) prevented the Sudanese police from entering the house of Salah Gosh, the former director-general of the agency, following an arrest warrant.

The Public Prosecutors Club said in a statement Tuesday that the incident took place on Monday 20 May 2019 following a warrant for Gosh’s  arrest and search of his house issued by the prosecution after a criminal case before the anti-corruption agency.

The force charged with guarding Gosh house, belonging to the NISS, refused the enforcement of the order and claimed that it had not been received such instructions. Further they “resisted the execution of the warrant and threatened to use the firearm.”

Gosh’s arrest warrant was issued to interrogate him on a banking account of 46 billion Sudanese pounds ($ 1 billion) of which he was the only one to be empowered to issue payment orders.

Gosh was a member of the military council that ousted al-Bashir in April, but he resigned immediately after the takeover.

Recently the Council spokesperson said the former NISS director had been placed under house arrest in Khartoum.

But news reports published in Khartoum on Monday said he is currently outside the country. He reportedly was in Washington before to head to the United Arab Emirates.

Al-Youm Altali newspaper said that during his visit to Washington he met with officials of the U.S. intelligence agency brief them about the situation in Sudan.

The Prosecutors condemned the behaviour of the guards of Gosh’s house and described it as a blatant violation of “the law and the sovereignty of the state by the forces of the National Intelligence and Security Services.”

They further called to dismiss the current NISS head and to restructure the agency, as well as “investigating this incident that affects the independence of the public prosecution.”
(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/spip.php?article67540

 

Please follow and like us:

Sudanese protesters plan mass rally as talks stall with army !

Protesters walk towards the sit in protest outside the Sudanese military headquarters, in Khartoum, Sudan, Tuesday, May 14, 2019. Sudanese protesters say security agents loyal to ousted President Omar al-Bashir attacked their sit-ins overnight, setting off clashes that left six people dead, including an army officer, and heightened tensions as the opposition holds talks with the ruling military council. Both the protesters and the transitional military council say the violence was instigated by al-Bashir loyalists from within the security forces. (AP Photo

By The Associated Press
KHARTOUM, Sudan — May 23, 2019, 6:52 AM ET

Sudan’s protest leaders are calling for mass rallies across the country amid deadlocked negotiations with the ruling military over its handover of power.

The Sudanese Professionals’ Association, which has spearheaded four months of protests that drove Omar al-Bashir from power in April, says it’s also calling for a “million man march” outside the military headquarters in Khartoum.

Thursday’s statement, posted on Facebook, says the protesters want to denounce the ruling generals’ resistance to relinquish power to a sovereign council that both side had already agreed should lead the country during the transitional period.

There are also indications that the SPA, a union umbrella, may call for a general strike.The two sides have held several rounds of talks since the military overthrew al-Bashir on April 11, ending his 30-year reign.

https://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/sudanese-protesters-plan-mass-rally-talks-stall-army-63224152

Please follow and like us:

‘Tired’ Sudan military wants to hand over power quickly.

General Mohamed Hamdan Dagal. Picture: REUTERS/MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

General Mohamed Hamdan Dagal. Picture: REUTERS/MOHAMED NURELDIN ABDALLAH

22 May 2019 – 17:50 Amina Ismail

Cairo — Sudan’s military wants to hand power to a democratically elected government as soon as possible in the tumultuous aftermath of former president Omar al-Bashir’s overthrow, a prominent general said in an interview published on Wednesday.

“We got tired. We want to hand over power today not tomorrow,” Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, deputy leader of the ruling military council, told Egypt’s state newspaper Al-Ahram.

The council has been locked in talks with an alliance of protest and opposition groups demanding civilian leadership for a new sovereign body to oversee a three-year transition to democracy. Talks were adjourned in the early hours of Tuesday, with no new date set for their resumption.

But Dagalo, who is widely known as Hemedti and leads Sudan’s feared paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF), said the military were impatient for a solution. “Members of the military council are not politicians and we are waiting for the government to be formed,” he said.

The general, who has emerged as the most prominent member of the military council that ousted and arrested Bashir following months of protests, added that judicial proceedings against the detained former president and some allies were proceeding.

“Up to now, we have arrested 25 member of the regime figures and we are preparing the files for their charges,” he said.

On Tuesday, Sudan’s main protest group — the Sudanese Professionals Association — called for a general strike, saying the military was still insisting on directing the transition and keeping a military majority on the council.

Late on Tuesday, a clip of Dagalo suggesting that those who go on strike could lose their jobs was widely circulated on social media. In response, protesters posted photos posing and carrying signs saying “Hemedti, come and fire me!”

Some protesters accused Dagalo’s RSF of shooting at demonstrations last week, when several protesters were killed and dozens more wounded. The military has denied it.    Reuters

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/world/africa/2019-05-22-tired-sudan-military-wants-to-hand-over-power-quickly/

Please follow and like us:

Sudan crisis: Military and opposition agree three-year transition.

May 15 , 2019

Sudan’s military leaders have announced an agreement with the opposition alliance for a three-year transition period to a civilian administration.

The Transitional Military Council (TMC) said the alliance would have two-thirds of the seats on a legislative council.

However, the two sides are yet to agree on a sovereign council – the top tier of power, where both want a majority.

Sudan has been ruled by the military council since last month’s toppling of President Omar al-Bashir.

Protests that led to his downfall have continued, with a huge sit-in outside the military headquarters to demand full civilian government.

Hours before the latest deal was announced, at least five protesters and a member of the security forces died in clashes in the capital, Khartoum.

There were reports of more gunshots on Wednesday in the area where demonstrations have been taking place. Activists have said that one person was killed and three were injured.

What has been agreed?

At a joint news conference on Tuesday night, Lt Gen Yasser al-Atta said a final agreement on power sharing would be signed with the opposition alliance – the Declaration of Freedom and Change Forces (DFCF) – within 24 hours. That would include the forming of a sovereign council which will rule the country until elections.

“We vow to our people that the agreement will be completed fully within 24 hours in a way that meets the people’s aspirations,” he said.

Gen Atta said the DFCF would have two-thirds of the seats on a 300-member transitional legislative council, while the rest would be taken by parties not members of the alliance.

Earlier, protest movement spokesman Taha Osman said the sides had agreed on the structure of future authorities – a sovereign council, a cabinet and a legislative body.

DFCF member Satea al-Hajj expressed optimism that the final details on power-sharing would be agreed, adding: “The viewpoints are close and, God willing, we will reach an agreement soon.”

The military had originally wanted a two-year transition period while protest leaders had sought four years to give them more time to prepare.
However, Sadiq Yousuf, a member of the DFCF negotiating team, told the BBC Newsday programme that the composition of the 11-member supreme council was still being discussed.

“The issue has been on the number of members of the supreme council. We want eight civilians, three from the military, but they want seven military and four members.”

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-48276764

 

Please follow and like us:

Sudan military rulers suspend talks with protesters for 72 hours!

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://sudantribune.com/spip.php?article67513

(Photo credit: Sudan Tribune.  Sudanese demonstrators  hold Friday prayers at the protest camp outside Army headquarters in Khartoum on May 3rd )

May 16 , 2019

Negotiations over political transition put on ice as violence flares in Khartoum, leaving several demonstrators wounded.

At least 14 people have been wounded, some from gunfire, when Sudanese forces tried to remove demonstrators from central Khartoum, according to a group linked to the protest movement, while Sudan’s military rulers suspended talks with opposition leaders on the installation of civilian rule for at least 72 hours.

The violence has endangered negotiations between the two sides that had appeared to be on course to reaching a deal on forming a joint sovereign council designed to steer the country towards democracy for a three-year transition period until elections were called.

Both the military and the opposition blamed each other for Wednesday’s violence.

“We hold the military council responsible for attacking civilians,” said Amjad Farid, a spokesman for the Sudanese Professionals’ Association (SPA), which spearheaded months of protests that led to the military’s removal of President Omar al-Bashir last month.

“They are using the same methods as the previous regime in dealing with rebels,” he told Reuters news agency.

But the head of Sudan’s Transitional Military Council (TMC), Lieutenant General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, accused the demonstrators of breaking an understanding on the de-escalation process while talks were under way and said protesters were disrupting life in the capital by blocking roads outside a protest zone agreed upon with the military.

In a televised speech broadcast early on Thursday, al-Burhan read out a long list of what he described as violations of understandings that had been reached with protest leaders and said the TMC had decided to call off talks for three days “until a suitable atmosphere is created to complete an agreement”.

“We decided to suspend the negotiations over civilian rule for 72 hours to help prepare an atmosphere for completing the deal,” al-Burhan said, demanding that protesters dismantle roadblocks in Khartoum, open bridges connecting the capital and other regions and “stop provoking security forces”.

Al-Burhan, the chief of the TMC that took power after overthrowing and jailing al-Bashir on April 11, justified the decision to suspend the crucial and final phase of negotiations by indicating that the overall security situation in the capital had deteriorated.

He said bridges, roads and a railway line had been closed and there was an “infiltration of armed elements among demonstrators who were shooting at security forces”.

Tensions running high

The developments came hours after protesters said troops in military vehicles using the logo of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF) fired extensively as they tried to clear demonstrators on al-Mek Nimir Avenue in central Khartoum, near the foreign ministry.

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors said at least 14 people were wounded.

“People were walking towards the barricades and they (security forces) were firing shots at them,” a 20-year-old demonstrator, who asked not to be named, told Reuters news agency, showing a handful of empty bullet casings and referring to roadblocks set up by protesters.

The RSF denied opening fire at demonstrators, state TV reported.

The violence took place hours before the TMC was due to meet representatives of the umbrella opposition group Declaration of Freedom and Change Forces (DFCF) to try to hammer out the final deal for the transition period.

Al Jazeera’s Hiba Morgan, reporting from Khartoum, called the suspension of the talks a “very significant development” that showed “the level of tension between the two sides”.

“Looking ahead, there is a lot of tension and many challenges between the two sides in trying to form a transitional government.”

Deadly violence

The violence came after the TMC announced earlier on Wednesday that after two days of talks it had brokered a deal with the DFCF alliance on the composition of a legislative council and a three-year transition period to a civilian administration.

Under the agreement the opposition alliance would have two-thirds of the seats on a legislative council, the TMC announced.

However, the two sides have yet to agree on the make-up of a sovereign council, the envisaged top tier of power during the planned transition period, with both wanting majority representation.

Amid the back-and-forth discussions, protesters pushing for a civilian-led transition have remained on the streets, including outside the army headquarters where a sit-in started on April 6.

Some roads in the centre of the capital have been blocked with stones, bricks, branches and slabs of concrete that security and paramilitary forces have occasionally tried to remove.

READ MORE

Sudan army and protesters agree on three-year transition period
On Monday, after security forces opened fire while trying to clear some protest sites, an outburst of violence left at least four people dead, including three protesters and a military police officer. They were the first deaths linked to the protests for several weeks.

Al Jazeera’s Morgan said the TMC denied responsibility for the violence.

“The military council came out and said the people who fired at protesters were not part of their forces or from the RSF,” she said, adding that the TMC said it would launch an independent investigation into the incident.

The United States blamed Sudan’s military rulers for the deaths, however.

“The tragic attacks on protesters … were clearly the result of the Transitional Military Council trying to impose its will on the protesters by attempting to remove roadblocks,” the US Embassy in Khartoum said in a statement on Facebook.

“The decision for security forces to escalate the use of force, including the unnecessary use of tear gas, led directly to the unacceptable violence later in the day that the TMC was unable to control.”

Al-Bashir charged

Separately on Monday, Sudan’s prosecutor general announced that al-Bashir had been charged “with inciting and participating” in the killing of protesters during the mass protests that led to the end of his decades-long rule.

There has been no comment from al-Bashir since his removal and arrest on April 11. The former president is reportedly being held at the maximum security Kobar prison in Khartoum.

Demonstrations against the 75-year-old were sparked by a government decision in December to slash bread and fuel subsidies but quickly escalated into wider calls for him to stand down.

Human Rights Watch, citing monitoring groups, said last month at least 70 protesters have been killed by government forces since the demonstrations began.

Last week, the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors put the death toll at more than 90.

SOURCE: Al Jazeera and news agencies.

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/05/sudanese-security-forces-open-fire-khartoum-sit-190515160917339.html

Please follow and like us:

Al Bashir charged with recent killing of demonstrators!

May 14 – 2019 KHARTOUM

The Public Prosecutor’s Office has charged the deposed President Omar Al Bashir and other former government leaders with incitement and involvement in the killing of demonstrators during the recent protests, according to the official Sudan News Agency (SUNA).

The former government leaders have been charged under article 177.2 of the Criminal Code. Investigations are conducted expeditiously in order to be able to arrest other former officials that are accused.

Prosecutions

As reported previously by Radio Dabanga, a group of prominent Sudanese lawyers announced on Monday that the country’s Attorney-General has accepted criminal proceedings against those who planned and carried out the military coup of June 30 1989, led by ousted President Omar Al Bashir, under articles 78 with 96 and 96) (B) of the Criminal Penal Code of 1983. Attorney-General El Waleed Sayed has warned those trying to cover up crimes of the accused or helping them escape.

The chairman of the group of lawyers and head of the Broad National Front, Ali Hasanein, explained to a press conference at Teiba Press Hall in Khartoum on Monday afternoon that after the 1983 coup, the National Islamic Front split into six entities including the Islamic Movement, the National Congress Party, the Popular Congress Party, the Reform Now Movement, the Platform for a Just Peace, and the Justice Party.

He explained that the charge does not include the Parties concerned, but rather, individuals involved in the coup. “We want to say that the affiliation of these persons to new parties and entities does not exempt them from criminal responsibility and advocacy does not fall statute of limitations.”

Criminal proceedings

He pointed out that criminal proceedings have been initiated against all those who planned, participated in, and carried out the coup in 1989. This includes all the members of the military revolutionary council headed by Omar Al Bashir, namely: Bakri Hasan Saleh, Tijani Adam El Tahir Byoyo Kwan, Martin Arab Moy, Ibrahim Nayel Idam, Suleiman Mohamed Suleiman, Salaheldin Karrar, Feisal Madani, Mohamed El Amin Khalifa, Dominique Cassiano, Feisal Abu Saleh, Osman El Hassan, Tayeb Ibrahim Kheir, Abdelrahim Hussein, Yousef Abdelfattah, Younis Mahmoud, Salah Abdallah (aka Salah Gosh) and Hasan Dahawi.

The list of civilians includes Osman Mohamed Taha, Nafi Ali Nafi, Awad Ahmed El Jaz, Ali Karti, Ali El Haj, Ibrahim El Sanousi, Ghazi Salaheldin, Mahdi Ibrahim, Abdelrahman Ibrahim, Ahmed El Taher, Amin Hasan Omar, Hasan Abdallah El Hussein, Ibrahim Ahmed Omar, Haj Satour, El Tayeb Mustafa, Hussein Khojali, Abdelrahim Hamdi, Serajeldin Hamid, Osman Khalid Mudawi, and Amin Banani.

Lawyer Kamal El Jazouli stressed that once the charges have been filed and the prosecution accepts them, legal procedures will be in force including a travel ban, investigation will be initiated, and other proceedings will follow.
He added: “We hope that legal proceedings will be starting today.” He also announced further criminal charges against Al Bashir and the leaders of the former regime. He explained that the group of lawyers believe that this case is very important at this time because such trials establish a solid democracy.

 

 

 

https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/al-bashir-charged-with-recent-killing-of-demonstrators

Please follow and like us:

Death of protesters in Sudan!

Sudanese protesters chant slogans as they gather for a sit-in outside the army headquarters in Khartoum on May 2, 2019. The military council and the Alliance for Freedom and Change (AFC) have agreed to form three organs – a sovereign council, a cabinet and a legislative body – to guide return to civilian rule. PHOTO | FILE | NATION MEDIA GROUP

By AFP
The death of seven Sudanese protesters and an army major undermined a potential breakthrough on the formation of transition authorities to run the country.

Five of the eight were shot dead on Monday in Khartoum when “unidentified elements” fired shots at the sit in outside the military headquarters, prompting fears that the military council could be up to some mischief.

The latest developments came as the prosecutor general’s office said ousted president Omar al-Bashir had been charged over the killings of protesters during anti-regime demonstrations that led to the end of his rule last month.

The umbrella protest movement the Alliance for Freedom and Change said Monday’s violence was to “disturb the breakthrough in the negotiations” with army generals as it blamed the bloodshed on the former regime’s militias.

Earlier on Monday, the generals and the protest movement said they had agreed on a “structure of the authorities and their powers” that would transfer authority to a civilian administration.

“The authorities are as follows — the sovereign council, the cabinet and the legislative body,” Taha Osman, a spokesman for the protest movement said.
He added another meeting was planned for Tuesday “to discuss the period of transition and the composition of the authorities”.

The military council confirmed the agreement and the agenda of the meeting later on Tuesday.

“We will continue to discuss the percentage of participation… and the transitional period,” council spokesman Lieutenant General Shamseddine Kabbashi told reporters.

https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/news/africa/Sudan-parties-agree-on-road-to-civilian-rule/4552902-5113890-lh8wvz/index.html

Please follow and like us: