US secretary of state speaks to Sudan’s deposed PM.

BBC NEWS 27 OCTOBER, 2021

Mr Hamdok was arrested and detained during Monday’s military coup

The US says Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, has spoken on the phone to Sudan’s deposed civilian prime minister, following Abdalla Hamdok’s return home.

Mr Hamdok was arrested and detained during Monday’s military coup.

In a statement, the US State Department said Mr Blinken welcomed Mr Hamdok’s release and reiterated his call to the Sudanese armed forces to free all the civilian leaders rounded up in the last 24 hours.

Protests against the seizure of power by the military continued into the night, with crowds in the capital Khartoum marching and blocking main roads.

Earlier, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan sought to justify the coup by accusing political groups of inciting civilians against the security forces.

https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/cq23pdgvgm8t/sudan

Sudan arrests 3 activist as pressure mounts on military!

October 27, 2021 at 3:51 am EDTBy SAMY MAGDY

CAIRO — (AP) — Sudanese security forces detained three prominent pro-democracy figures, family members and activists said Wednesday, as international pressure mounted on the country’s military to walk back the coup it staged earlier this week.

The overnight arrests in the capital Khartoum came a few hours after the military allowed deposed Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and his wife to return home.

Hamdok, a former U.N. economist, was detained along with many government officials and political figures when the military seized power on Monday.

The military takeover threatens to halt Sudan’s fitful transition to democracy which got under way after the 2019 ouster of long-time ruler Omar al-Bashir and his Islamist government in a popular uprising.

The new strongman, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, has pledged to hold elections, as planned, in July 2023, and to appoint a technocrat government in the meantime. But critics doubt the military is serious about eventually ceding control to civilian rule.

The coup came just weeks before Burhan was supposed to hand over the leadership of the top ruling body, the Sovereign Council, to a civilian. The council is made up of civilians and members of the military. Separately, Hamdok’s transitional government ran day-to-day affairs.

The activists taken overnight are Ismail al-Taj, a leader with the Sudanese Professionals’ Association, the group at the forefront of the protests that brought down al-Bashir; Sediq al-Sadiq al-Mahdi, a leader in Sudan’s largest political party, known as Umma and brother of Foreign Minister Mariam al-Mahdi; and Khalid al-Silaik, a former medial adviser to the prime minister. That’s according to Al-Silaik’s wife, Marwa Kamel, and activists Nazim Siraj and Nazik Awad.

Kamel said al-Silaik was detained moments after he gave an interview to Al-Jazeera satellite television.

The three have been outspoken critics of the military takeover. Tens of thousands of Sudanese who took to the streets in the past two days to call for the return of the Hamdok government. Security forces confronting protesters killed at least four people and wounded over 140 others in the past two days.

On Monday, Burhan, the head of the military, dissolved the Sovereign Council and the transitional government, and declared a state of emergency. He alleged that the military was forced to step in to prevent the country from sliding into civil war.

The takeover came after weeks of mounting tensions between military and civilian leaders over the course and pace of Sudan’s transition to democracy.

https://www.wpxi.com/news/sudan-arrests-3/R23V66GSTKOYVQUSOLOJEX7JBA/






Sudan’s prime minister, detained after coup, returns home.

story.lead_photo.caption
People burn tires during a protest a day after the military seized power Khartoum, Sudan, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021. The takeover came after weeks of mounting tensions between military and civilian leaders over the course and the pace of Sudan’s transition to democracy. (AP Photo/Marwan Ali)

Oct. 26 2021 @ 11:05pm

CAIRO (AP) — Sudan’s deposed prime minister and his wife were allowed to return home Tuesday after being detained when the military seized power in a coup, officials said,

The release of Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok and his wife followed international condemnation of the coup and calls for the military to release all the government officials who were detained when Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan seized power on Monday.

Burhan had said earlier Tuesday Hamdok had been held for his own safety and would be released. But he warned other members of the dissolved government could face trial as protests against the putsch continued in the streets.

Hamdok and his wife were returned to their home in Khartoum’s upscale Kafouri neighborhood, and the house was under “heavy security,” said a military official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief the media. The official did not say whether they were free to leave or make calls. An official at Hamdok’s office and pro-democracy activist Nazim Siraj confirmed his return home.

The military seized power Monday in a move that was widely denounced abroad. On Tuesday, pro-democracy demonstrators blocked roads in the capital of Khartoum with makeshift barricades and burning tires. Troops fired on crowds a day earlier, killing four protesters, according to doctors.

In his second public appearance since seizing power, Burhan said Tuesday the military was forced to step in to resolve a growing political crisis.

“There were people who were talking about discriminating against others, and that was driving this country to reach a civil war that would lead to the fragmentation of this country, tearing apart its unity, its fabric and society. These dangers were in front of us,” Burhan told a televised news conference.

But the coup came less than a month before Burhan was supposed to hand the leadership of the Sovereign Council that runs the country to a civilian — a step that would have decreased the military’s hold on power.

“The whole country was deadlocked due to political rivalries,” Burhan said. “The experience during the past two years has proven that the participation of political forces in the transitional period is flawed and stirs up strife.”

Hamdok had been held at Burhan’s home, the general said, and was in good health. But of the many other senior government officials detained Monday, Burhan alleged some had tried to incite a rebellion within the armed forces, saying they would face trial. Others who are found “innocent” would be freed, he added.

The takeover came after weeks of mounting tensions between military and civilian leaders over the course and the pace of Sudan’s transition to democracy. It threatened to derail that process, which has progressed in fits and starts since the overthrow of longtime autocrat Omar al-Bashir in a popular uprising two years ago.

The U.N. Security Council was to discuss the situation in Sudan, a nation in Africa linked by language and culture to the Arab world, at a closed-door meeting later Tuesday. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres urged world powers to come together to act decisively at the council, saying unity was needed to confront an “epidemic of coups d’état” recently.

Hamdok’s office had voiced concern for his safety and for the other detained officials. In a statement, it accused the military leaders of acting in concert with Islamists, who have argued for a military government, and other politicians linked to the now-dissolved National Congress Party, which dominated Sudan during al-Bashir’s Islamist- backed rule.

U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration announced the halt of $700 million in emergency assistance to Sudan and said Tuesday it was looking at sending stronger signals to the generals.

“They should first and foremost cease any violence against innocent civilians, and … they should release those who have been detained and they should get back on a democratic path,” said National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan, adding the U.S. is working with countries in Gulf, where the generals have allies.

Mariam al-Mahdi, the foreign minister in the dissolved government, declared Tuesday she and other members of Hamdok’s administration remained the legitimate authority in Sudan.

“We are still in our positions. We reject such coup and such unconstitutional measures,” she told the Associated Press by phone from her home in Khartoum. “We will continue our peaceful disobedience and resistance.”

The Ministry of Culture and Information, still loyal to the deposed government, said in a Facebook post Sudanese ambassadors in Belgium, Switzerland and France have defected.

Nureldin Satti, the Sudanese envoy to the U.S., said he was working with those diplomats to “resist the military coup in support of the heroic struggle of the Sudanese people” to achieve the aims of the uprising against al-Bashir. But he did not specify whether he, too, had defected.

Al-Mahdi, meanwhile, spoke to the wife of one of the officials detained, Minister of Cabinet Affairs Khalid Omar, and said he was humiliated and mistreated during his arrest.

“They (military forces) took Khalid barefoot, wearing only his nightclothes,” she said.

Hours after the arrests, Sudanese flooded the streets of Khartoum and other cities in protest. At least four people were killed and over 80 wounded when security forces opened fire, according to the Sudan Doctors’ Committee. Human Rights Watch said forces used live ammunition against the demonstrators.

Sudan saw a bloody crackdown on pro-democracy protests in 2019, and there were fears about whether there would be another crackdown. Some protesters blocked streets on Tuesday, and online video showed marches in several neighborhoods of Khartoum and its twin city of Omdurman. They chanted, “Retribution!” and “Blood for blood, we won’t accept compensations!”

A bigger test of how the military will respond to the resistance could come Saturday when protesters plan a mass march to demand a return to civilian rule.

The Sudanese Professionals’ Association, a group of unions which was behind the uprising against al-Bashir, also urged people to go on strike and engage in civil disobedience. Separately, the Sudan Popular Liberation Movement—North, the country’s main rebel group, denounced the coup and called for people to take to the streets.

In a sign of the divisions among the civilian leaders in Sudan, a group known as the Justice and Equality Movement blamed the deposed government for the military takeover. It said a few officials had monopolized decision-making and refused to engage in dialogue.

The group, headed by Finance Minister Gibreil Ibrahim, is the first to publicly voice support for the military but also urged it to end the state of emergency, release the detainees and appoint a civilian government to run day-to-day activities. Earlier this month, the group had taken part in a pro-military sit-in in Khartoum.

Another pro-military group that splintered from the protest movement that ousted al-Bashir also welcomed the takeover, saying it would end a sit-in it had organized outside the presidential palace to support the generals earlier this month.

The military has sent mixed signals about Sudan’s future. Burhan promised to gradually restore internet and communications services that were disrupted in the coup. But the Civil Aviation Authority said it was suspending all flights to and from Khartoum’s airport until Oct. 30.

On Monday, Burhan dissolved the Hamdok government and the Sovereign Council, a joint military and civilian body created after al-Bashir’s ouster to run the country. He now heads a military council he said would rule Sudan until elections in July 2023.

The general said he is serious about holding elections on schedule, but it is not clear if the military will be willing to release the grip it has had for decades.

https://www.fultonsun.com/news/international/story/2021/oct/27/sudans-prime-minister-detained-after-coup-returns-home/893679/

Apparent Sudan coup draws international concern; UN calls arrests ‘unacceptable’ .

25 October , 2021

Sudanese protesters lift national flags next to a brick roadblock during a demonstration in the capital Khartoum, on October 25, 2021, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of members of Sudan's government. (Photo by AFP)
Sudanese protesters lift national flags next to a brick roadblock during a demonstration in the capital Khartoum, on October 25, 2021, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of members of Sudan’s government. (Photo by AFP)
In this file photo taken on October 31, 2019, then-president of the Sudanese Transitional Council, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, speaks during an army exercise on the outskirts of the capital Khartoum (ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP)
In this file photo taken on October 31, 2019, then-president of the Sudanese Transitional Council, General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, speaks during an army exercise on the outskirts of the capital Khartoum (ASHRAF SHAZLY / AFP)

The chairman of Sudan’s ruling body General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan announces the dissolution of the transitional government and the sovereign council and declares a nationwide state of emergency.

Just hours after the information ministry said most of the civilians in the two bodies had been detained, including the prime minister, Burhan reiterates his commitment to “the transition towards a civilian state.”

He says he will form a “competent” government, pledged to create numerous state institutions like the supreme court, and says Sudan remains committed to international agreements it has signed.

It isn’t immediately clear whether this means the new leadership will follow through on last year’s normalization deal with Israel.

Arab League, Organization of Islamic Cooperation voice concern about Sudan coup

By AP

The Arab League and the Saudi-based Organization of Islamic Cooperation release statements of concern about the apparent military coup in Sudan.

The Secretary-General of the 22-member bloc, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, urges all parties to “fully abide” by the constitutional declaration signed in August 2019, which had aimed to pave the way for a transition to civilian rule and democratic elections following the ouster of longtime autocrat Omar al-Bashir.

“There are no problems that cannot be resolved without dialogue,” Aboul Gheit says after Sudan’s military detained the country’s interim prime minister along with other top Cabinet officials.

“It is important to respect all decisions and agreements that were decided upon … refraining from any measures that would disrupt the transitional period and shake stability in Sudan,” the statement adds.

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation, in a statement carried by the state-run Saudi Press Agency, urges Sudanese leaders to “abide by the constitutional document and what has been agreed upon during the transition period.”

The 57-nation OIC is based in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia.

Thousands of Sudanese protesters have flooded the streets as fears of a military coup grip the country two years after mass protests ousted al-Bashir, who ruled Sudan with an iron fist for three decades.

UN mission denounces arrest of Sudan leaders as ‘unacceptable’

By AP

The United Nations Mission to Sudan has issued an emphatic rebuke of what it calls an ongoing coup and attempts to undermine the northeast African nation’s fragile democratic transition.

The first reports about a possible military takeover began trickling out of Sudan before dawn Monday. By mid-morning, the information ministry confirmed that the prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok, had been arrested and taken to an undisclosed location. Several senior government figures were also detained, the ministry said in a Facebook post. It said their whereabouts were unknown.

“The reported detentions of the prime minister, government officials and politicians are unacceptable,” says the recently formed UN political mission, which has a mandate to assist the country’s political transition and protect human rights.

The mission calls on Sudan’s security forces “to immediately release those who have been unlawfully detained or placed under house arrest” and urges all parties to “exercise utmost restraint.”

Diplomats have joined in a chorus of concern over the events that have rocked Sudan, as Sudanese security forces detained senior government officials in undisclosed locations and thousands flooded the street in protest, two years after mass demonstrations helped topple former autocrat Omar al-Bashir.

US ‘alarmed’ by apparent Sudan coup; EU expresses ‘utmost concern’

By AP

The European Union has joined the United States in expressing grave concern about an apparent military takeover underway in Sudan.

EU foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell tweets that he’s following events in the northeast African nation with the “utmost concern.”

“The EU calls on all stakeholders and regional partners to put back on track the transition process,” Borrell writes, referring to Sudan’s fragile transition from autocracy to democracy after the ouster of longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

Earlier, US Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa Jeffrey Feltman said Washington was “deeply alarmed” and indicated that a military coup would threaten American aid to the impoverished country.

“As we have said repeatedly, any changes to the transitional government by force puts at risk US assistance,” the US Bureau of African Affairs wrote on Twitter.

https://www.timesofisrael.com/liveblog-october-25-2021/

Sudan general declares state of emergency after PM arrested in apparent coup!

By Press Association 2021

UK NEWS 25 OCTOBER, 2021

A man shouts slogans during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan
 A man shouts slogans during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan

Sudan’s leading general has declared a state of emergency, hours after his forces arrested the acting prime minister and disrupted the internet in an apparent coup as the country was nearing a planned transition to a civilian leadership.

In a televised address, General Abdel-Fattah Burhan announced that he was dissolving the country’s ruling Sovereign Council, as well as the government led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok.

He said quarrels among political factions prompted the military to intervene and that a new technocrat government would lead the country to elections.

Gen Burhan pledged to complete the country’s democratic transition.

In this frame taken from video people gather during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan
In this frame taken from video people gather during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan (New Sudan NNS via AP)

Thousands of people flooded the streets of the capital Khartoum and its twin city of Omdurman to protest over the apparent military takeover.

Footage shared online appeared to show protesters blocking streets and setting fire to tyres as security forces used tear gas to disperse them.

Protesters could be heard chanting, “The people are stronger, stronger” and “Retreat is not an option!” as plumes of smoke filled the air.

Videos on social media showed large crowds crossing bridges over the Nile to the centre of the capital.

At least 12 protesters were wounded in demonstrations, according to the Sudanese Doctors Committee.

A takeover by the military would be a major setback for Sudan, which has grappled with a stop-and-go transition to democracy since long-time autocrat Omar al-Bashir was toppled by mass protests two years ago.

The moves come less than a month before Gen Burhan was expected to hand the leadership of the ruling transitional council to a civilian.

The Sovereign Council, which has run the country since shortly after Mr al-Bashir’s ousting, includes both military and civilian members, who have frequently disagreed over Sudan’s course and the pace of the transition to democracy.

Sudanese demonstrators take to the streets of the capital Khartoum to demand the government’s transition to civilian rule in Khartoum, Sudan, on Thursday
Sudanese demonstrators take to the streets of the capital Khartoum to demand the government’s transition to civilian rule on Thursday (Marwan Ali/AP)

The United States and the European Union expressed concern over Monday’s developments.

Jeffrey Feltman, the US special envoy to the Horn of Africa, said Washington was “deeply alarmed” by the reports.

Mr Feltman met with Sudanese officials over the weekend in an effort to resolve the growing dispute between civilian and military leaders.

EU foreign affairs chief Joseph Borrell tweeted that he is following events with the “utmost concern”.

The first reports about a possible military takeover began trickling out of Sudan before dawn on Monday.

By mid-morning, the Information Ministry confirmed that the prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok, had been arrested and taken to an undisclosed location.

Several senior government figures were also detained, the ministry said in a Facebook post.

It said their whereabouts were unknown.

Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok
Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok (AP)

Mr Hamdok’s office said in a statement on Facebook that he and his wife were detained early on Monday as part of what it described as a “complete coup”.

In other hallmarks of a takeover, internet access was widely disrupted and the country’s state news channel played patriotic traditional music.

At one point, military forces stormed the offices of Sudan’s state-run television in Omdurman and detained a number of workers, the Information Ministry said.

Monday’s apparent takeover came after weeks of rising tensions between Sudan’s civilian and military leaders.

A failed coup attempt in September fractured the country along old lines, pitting more conservative Islamists who want a military government against those who toppled Mr al-Bashir in protests.

In recent days, both camps have taken to the street in demonstrations.

After the September coup attempt, the generals lashed out at civilian members of the transitional power structure and called for the dissolution of Mr Hamdok’s government.

The Sovereign Council is the ultimate decision maker, though the Hamdok government is tasked with running Sudan’s day-to-day affairs.

Sudanese demonstrators demand the government’s transition to civilian rule in Khartoum on Thursday
Sudanese demonstrators demand the government’s transition to civilian rule in Khartoum on Thursday (Marwan Ali/AP)

Gen Burhan, who leads the council, warned in televised comments last month that the military would hand over power only to a government elected by the Sudanese people.

His comments suggested he might not stick to the previously agreed timetable, which called for the council to be led by a military figure for 21 months, followed by a civilian for the following 18 months.

Under that plan, the handover was to take place sometime in November, with the new civilian leader to be chosen by an alliance of unions and political parties that led the uprising against Mr al-Bashir.

Since Mr al-Bashir was forced from power, Sudan had slowly emerged from years of international pariah status.

The country was removed from the United States’ state supporter of terror list in 2020, opening the door for badly needed foreign loans and investment.

But the country’s economy has struggled with the shock of a number of economic reforms called for by international lending institutions.

Sudan has suffered other coups since it gained its independence from Britain and Egypt in 1956.

Mr al-Bashir came to power in 1989 in one such takeover, which removed the country’s last elected government.

Sudanese demonstrators in the capital Khartoum on Thursday
Sudanese demonstrators in the capital Khartoum on Thursday (Marwan Ali/AP)

Among those detained on Monday were five senior government figures, according to two officials.

They include industry minister Ibrahim al-Sheikh, information minister Hamza Baloul, and Mohammed al-Fiky Suliman, a member of the Sovereign Council, as well as Faisal Mohammed Saleh, a media adviser to Mr Hamdok.

Ayman Khalid, governor of the state containing the capital, was also arrested, according to the official Facebook page of his office.

After news of the arrests spread, the country’s main pro-democracy group and two political parties issued appeals to the Sudanese to take to the streets.

One of the factions, the Communist Party, called on workers to go on strike in an act of mass civil disobedience after what it described as a “full military coup” orchestrated by Gen Burhan.

The African Union has called for the release of all Sudanese political leaders including Mr Hamdok.

“Dialogue and consensus is the only relevant path to save the country and its democratic transition,” said Moussa Faki, the head of the AU commission .

https://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/news/national/19670372.sudan-general-declares-state-emergency-pm-arrested-apparent-coup/

Who is Sudan’s Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok?

Oct 25, 2021

An image that illustrates this article Who is Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok?
Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok

At the head of a transitional government since August 2019, Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has been instrumental in a number of breakthroughs in the country’s recent history, following a popular uprising against the decades-long rule of former dictator Omar Al Bashir in April 2019.

Mr Hamdok’s achievements include securing Sudan’s removal from the US state sponsors of terrorism list, a first step towards receiving much needed financial aid and improving Sudan’s international status.

On Monday, Sudan’s military arrested Mr Hamdok and other members of his civilian-led government, which was formed following the uprising that ended Bashir’s 30 years of Islamist rule.

Until his arrest, Mr Hamdok’s extensive background in finance and connections proved effective in alleviating the country’s economic woes, although major issues such as a lack of basic necessities, including fuel and bread, remain

Despite this, Mr Hamdok retains popularity among civilian opposition groups, including the Forces for Freedom and Change and the Sudanese Professionals’ Association, which were both key groups in the 2019 revolution.

Who is Abdalla Hamdok?

Born in 1956, Mr Hamdok, served as an official in the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning in his 30s before working in the private sector with one of the ‘Big Four’ auditing companies, Deloitte & Touche.

Sudanese protesters march in the Sudanese capital Khartoum, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of members of Sudan’s government, on October 25, 2021. AFP

He then rose in seniority and held several positions in the International Labour Organisation and the African Development Fund, as well as the UN Economic Commission for Africa.

He was sworn in as Sudan’s 15th prime minister on August 21, 2019, after the military coup that toppled Bashir, to lead a transitional civilian and military-led government.

Under his rule, the Juba Peace Agreement was signed on October 3, 2020 to effectively end a decades-long conflict between the government and rebel groups in the south of Sudan.

Why was he arrested?

Although specifics about his arrest, including his whereabouts, remain unknown, Mr Hamdok had reportedly refused to support a military coup against the transitional government’s ruling Sovereign Council.

Instead, he and other groups called on the Sudanese public to hold their ground and “resist” military intervention, the Ministry of Information said.

Opposition groups continued to organise protests as demonstrators flooded the streets of the capital, Khartoum, setting tyres alight and blocking roads.

Following Monday’s events, internet connectivity monitor NetBlocks confirmed “significant disruption” in Sudan’s internet services, affecting major telecommunication providers, in an apparent attempt to prevent public gatherings from growing.

A military takeover would “contravene the Constitutional Declaration and the democratic aspirations of the Sudanese people,” Jeffrey Feltman, US Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa, said in a post on Twitter, calling the move “utterly unacceptable”.

https://www.thenationalnews.com/mena/2021/10/25/who-is-sudans-prime-minister-abdalla-hamdok/

Sudan’s Hamdok moved to unknown location after refusing to support coup!

25 October, 2021 REUTERS

Sudan's new Prime Minister in the transitional government Abdalla Hamdok, speaks during a Reuters interview in Khartoum, Sudan August 24, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Files
Sudan’s Prime Minister in the transitional government Abdalla Hamdok, speaks during a Reuters interview in Khartoum, Sudan August 24, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/File

CAIRO, Oct 25 (Reuters) – Sudan’s Prime Minster Abdalla Hamdok was moved to an unknown location after refusing to issue a statement in support of an ongoing military coup, the information ministry said on Monday.

Joint military forces holding Hamdok under house arrest were pressuring him to issue a supportive statement, the information ministry said earlier on Monday.

It cited Hamdok calling on the Sudanese people to resist the coup attempt peacefully and “defend their revolution”.

https://www.reuters.com/world/africa/sudans-hamdok-moved-unknown-location-after-refusing-support-coup-2021-10-25/

Sudan’s military detains prime minister in apparent coup!!

Image: SUDAN-UNREST-POLITICS
Sudanese protesters burn tires to block a road in the capital Khartoum, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of members of Sudan’s government, on Monday. AFP – Getty Images

Oct. 25, 2021, 10:40 AM SASTBy The Associated Press

Crowds flooded the streets to protest the move, chanting “The people are stronger, stronger” and “Retreat is not an option!” as plumes of smoke filled the air.

CAIRO — Military forces arrested Sudan’s acting prime minister and senior government officials Monday, disrupted internet access and blocked bridges in the capital Khartoum, the country’s information ministry said, describing the actions as a coup.

In response, thousands flooded the streets of Khartoum and its twin city of Omdurman to protest the apparent military takeover. Footage shared online appeared to show protesters blocking streets and setting fire to tires as security forces used tear gas to disperse them.

Protesters could be heard chanting, “The people are stronger, stronger” and “Retreat is not an option!” as plumes of smoke from burning tires filled the air.

Image: SUDAN-UNREST-POLITICS
Armed forces detained Sudan’s Prime Minister over his refusal to support their “coup,” the information ministry said, after weeks of tensions.Ashraf Shazly / AFP – Getty Images

A takeover by the military would be a major setback for Sudan, which has grappled with a stop-and-go transition to democracy since long-time ruler Omar al-Bashir was toppled by mass protests two years ago.

The United States and the European Union expressed concern over Monday’s developments.

Jeffrey Feltman, the U.S. special envoy to the Horn of Africa, said Washington was “deeply alarmed” by reports. Feltman had met with Sudanese officials over the weekend in an effort to resolve a growing dispute between the country’s civilian and military leaders. EU foreign affairs chief Josep Borrell tweeted that he’s following events with the “utmost concern.”

The first reports about a possible military takeover began trickling out of Sudan before dawn Monday. By mid-morning, the information ministry confirmed that the prime minister, Abdalla Hamdok, had been arrested and taken to an undisclosed location. Several senior government figures were also detained, the ministry said in a Facebook post. It said their whereabouts were unknown.

In other hallmarks of a takeover, internet access was widely disrupted and the country’s state news channel played patriotic traditional music. At one point, military forces stormed the offices of Sudan’s state-run television in Omdurman and detained a number of workers, the information ministry said.

Monday’s apparent takeover came after weeks of rising tensions between Sudan’s civilian and military leaders. A failed coup attempt in September fractured the country along old lines, pitting more-conservative Islamists who want a military government against those who toppled al-Bashir in protests. In recent days, both camps have taken to the street in demonstrations.

Image: SUDAN-UNREST-POLITICS
Protesters burned tires to block a road in defiance of the detentions by the army.AFP – Getty Images

Under Hamdok and the transitional council, Sudan had slowly emerged from years of international pariah status in which it existed under al-Bashir. The country was removed from the United States’ state supporter of terror list in 2020, opening the door for badly needed international loans and investment. But the country’s economy has struggled with the shock of a number economic reforms called for by international lending institutions.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/sudans-army-detains-pm-officials-apparent-coup-rcna3688

Massive Pro-Military Sit-In Shakes Sudan Democracy Efforts!

October 18, 2021 9:54 PM

Sudanese protesters take to the streets in the capital Khartoum durning a demonstration demanding the dissolution of the transitional government on Oct. 18, 2021.
Sudanese protesters take to the streets in the capital Khartoum durning a demonstration demanding the dissolution of the transitional government on Oct. 18, 2021.

HARDOUM — 

On Monday, as thousands of demonstrators aligned with the Sudan military remain outside the presidential palace for a third day, analysts warn that the civilian-led interim government is facing a growing crisis that could topple its rule.

With upheaval escalating nationwide, government leaders must find a way to “defuse the polarization” and “reach a compromise,” said political analyst Hassan Haj Ali.

FILE - Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok holds a press conference at the Council of Ministers in the capital Khartoum, August 15, 2021.
FILE – Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok holds a press conference at the Council of Ministers in the capital Khartoum, August 15, 2021.

Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok should “make a partial reshuffle of his Cabinet and appoint new ministers” or expand the number of ministers in the transitional government, Ali said.

Sudan is facing its most trying political challenges since it formed an interim government among rival factions after the fall of ex-president Omar al-Bashir in 2019.

After a political coup attempt was thwarted in September, al-Bashir loyalists have upped their dissent and are demanding changes to the civilian Cabinet and the shaky coalition co-running the government.

“The essence of this crisis … is the inability to reach a consensus on a national project among the revolutionary and change forces,” Hamdok said in a televised address last week.

People participating in the massive sit-in outside the presidential palace in Khartoum are demanding the government be dissolved and replaced with technocrats.

Sudan will never have a stable government if only a small group of people continue to make the decisions, said protester Ibrahim Ishaaq Yousif.

“The situation is deteriorating every day, people are unable to find bread, and life has become hard for everyone in this country,” he told South Sudan in Focus. “The government has been dominated by only four political parties, and they are unable to do something to change the situation.”

Interim government supporters say members of the military and security forces are driving the latest protests, which involve counterrevolutionary sympathizers of al-Bashir.

Some protesters accuse political parties within the Forces of Freedom and Change (FFC) alliance of excluding them from the country’s political processes and say the government is not doing enough to achieve the objectives of Sudanese revolutionaries who sacrificed their lives for the cause.

Hamdok should consider dissolving the Cabinet and expanding the political participation in the FFC coalition, said protester Omer Yousif.

Hamdok should “change this Cabinet not from the parties but from the professionals among the common people,” he told South Sudan in Focus. “All the infrastructures will be damaged soon. That is why we focus on changing this regime for the better.”

Sudanese protesters take to the streets in the capital Khartoum durning a demonstration demanding the dissolution of the transitional government on Oct.18, 2021.
Sudanese protesters take to the streets in the capital Khartoum durning a demonstration demanding the dissolution of the transitional government on Oct.18, 2021.

Khartoum-based analyst Ali said the government must quickly institute changes.

“Now the trend or the compromise probably is that the prime minister would perform a partial change in his government in order to please those who are demanding change and at the same time keep his own coalition intact by letting members stay in the council of ministers,” Ali told South Sudan in Focus.

Ali also recommends setting a timetable for the composition of the legislative assembly and taking steps toward organizing a general election, which is tentatively slated for late 2023.

The protesters began the sit-in on Saturday by chanting “one people, one army” and setting up tents in front of the presidential palace. They say they will not leave until their demands are met.

“The country is striving, and the people are tired,” said protester Muhiddeen Adam Juma, a member of the Sudan Liberation Movement faction. “People need to move to real democracy and prosperity.

“But few political forces want to drive the policy of this county by the same policies of the previous administration,” Juma told South Sudan in Focus. “And these policies will never take us anywhere.”

Hamdok, in his televised address, reiterated the government’s commitment to dialogue and to seeking a solution to any political disputes. He also guaranteed the safety and security of people who take part in peaceful protests.

“We respect the right of our people for a peaceful democratic expression,” he said. “They got this right through their continuous struggle, and we shall work to safeguard this right.”

VOA’s Nabeel Biajo contributed to this report from Washington.

https://www.voanews.com/a/massive-pro-military-sit-in-shakes-sudan-democracy-efforts-/6276352.html

Sudan works with Egypt to dismantle Muslim Brotherhood.

December 31, 2020

Egypt
The flags of Egypt and Sudan

Egypt wants to work together with Sudan to counter extremist groups and the Muslim Brotherhood, which have significant political influence in Egypt. Since Abdul Fatah Al-Sisi overthrew former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood has faced political pressure from Egypt’s military government. The government changed Morsi’s plans to lead the country based on the Muslim brotherhood ideologies. It has adopted a pro-Western policy. Although Egypt’s current president, Al-Sisi, has been widely accused of human rights abuses, he has focused on the Muslim Brotherhood as a challenge to his government.

Recently, the Sudanese government began working with Egypt to dismantle the Muslim Brotherhood, which is recognized as a terrorist organization by many countries around the world. Egypt wants to take advantage of Sudan’s efforts to help Egypt diminish the ideologies of this Muslim Organization, which poses a challenge to North African politics. The two countries have jointly begun to initiate new training and guidance for imams in Egypt this month to prevent radicalization to spread in the region.

Minister of Religious Affairs of the Sudan Nasr al-Din Mufreh said that the purpose of training opened in Cairo to train imams and remove complex radical thoughts to promote peace, harmony and the eradicate any group who believes in extremist philosophy. It is clear that the two countries are working together to reduce the power of religious groups and to find religious groups that are compatible with the current democratic system. From the Egyptian point of view, this is a great advantage for President Abdul Fatah Alzisi, who is facing a difficult political situation and needs the support of neighboring countries.

Read more : Libya, Egyptian delegation in Tripoli for the first time in six years

Sudan, on the other hand, recovering from Hassan Bashir’s dictatorship, wants to create an open policy with the international community and neighboring countries. Sudan recently announced that it had entered into an agreement with Israel to normalize relations. The deal, brokered by the United States, was to remove Sudan the list of terrorist organization backed countries. This was a great opportunity for Sudan, but the Israeli-Sudanese agreement created a rift within Sudan that was seen as a coercion for the Sudanese people.

Minister of Endowment speaking the opening meeting also stressed that the purpose of the conference is to enhance the tolerance of Islam, and the eradication of ideas based extremism and violence. He noted that extremism is fueling war, hatred and violence, and that the world does not need it today. He said relations between Egypt and Sudan were based on co-operation and needed to be improved.Sudan, on the other hand, is working to counter the Islamic Brotherhood. It is a national plan to oppose terrorist group and join the Egyptian government to dismantle Muslim Brotherhood. According to reports, Sudan has revoked the citizenship of several suspected members of the Muslim Brotherhood and handed them over to Egypt.

https://thearabposts.com/sudan-works-with-egypt-to-dismantle-muslim-brotherhood/