Sudanese parliament says claims about lack of religious freedoms “exaggerations”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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November 28, 2017 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese parliament has described claims of rights groups and some opposition parties over religious coexistence in the country as “mere exaggerations”.

During his visit to Khartoum earlier this month, The U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John J. Sullivan, called to hold a roundtable conference on religious freedoms and coexistence to promote the dialogue between Muslim and Christian clerics in Sudan.

He also expressed his country’s concern over the situation of religious freedoms in the country, especially pointing to the “destruction of churches and the arrest of priests.”

However, Sudan’s parliamentary subcommittee on legislation, justice and human rights on Wednesday has expressed keenness to promote and protect human rights, saying it seeks to reconcile between the local laws and the regional and international conventions in this regard.

The semi-official Sudan Media Center Wednesday quoted the head of the committee Osman Adam Nimir as saying Sudan has amended local legislation pertaining to human rights to be compatible with the international conventions.

He described claims of some opposition parties and rights organizations regarding religious coexistence in the country as “exaggerations”.

Nimir added Sudan hasn’t experienced any problems regarding coexistence between Muslims and the other religious minorities.

He stressed that human rights in Sudan are maintained according to the constitution and the laws as well as the existing beliefs and traditions.

The Sudanese government has been accused of restricting the religious freedom of Sudanese Christians.

Last June, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, accused Sudan of continuing to arrest religious leaders and to demolish churches. Following what President Donald Trump delayed the permanent revocation of economic sanctions for three months.

Also, seven U.S. groups in June called on the Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to take into account the lack of religious freedoms and the persecution of religious minorities in Sudan before to take a decision to lift the economic embargo imposed on the East African nation.

Last week, Sudan’s main clerical authority, the Sudan Scholar Corporation (SSC) denied the existence of religious conflicts in the country saying followers of various religions have lived together in peace and harmony for a long time.

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